Two ways of using the graph as a tool for thought

The filtering options in the Obsidian 0.9.0 open up new workflows.

This video shows two that I’ve found as being super useful for idea development:

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Thanks for making a video with your thoughts. I’ve been avoiding your IMF stuff because I see a lot of jargon and I don’t want to get sucked down a rabbit hole (not putting value judgment on it). But videos for some reason are easier for me to engage with and these are very well made! I didn’t realize how much they expanded graph view functionality from the patch notes, so I found this helpful.

As some one who doesn’t really understand graph view, I’d love to see some more videos on how you actually get utility out of it that you wouldn’t normally.

Also anyone else, if you know of any good books or blog posts on good use cases of network diagrams (besides being fun visualizations), let me know.

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Would appreciate that as well!

@nickmilo Keep it up, great stuff. I also have to say I found your thoughts on MOC’s to be extremely useful.

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Thanks for sharing this video! The new graph view really f…ing rocks! :clap:

However, have you already realized the partially different filtering options of the “local graph”? There you can additionally filter by “Incoming” and “outgoing” links and it allows you to chose the depth of connections shown in the graph (only show direct links; show second level linkings, and so on).

The local graph with its filtering options actually comes close to my feature request here - if there could be a further filtering option in the (local) graph view for showing notes related by tags instead of links, that would possibly even be the much cooler solution than the one I was thinking about! :slightly_smiling_face:

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I totally get that. And thank you.

As some one who doesn’t really understand graph view, I’d love to see some more videos on how you actually get utility out of it that you wouldn’t normally.

I think the video shows a couple ways getting utility. Not saying there weren’t other ways to get that utility already, but the new graph filtering certainly helps provides visual context.

Here’s another way it can provide utility based wholly on a specific workflow. In this case, as I change the “non-existent” note into a newly created note, I keep the “TK” in the title to tell me that this is a fledgling note.

Definitely a specific, almost idiosyncratic use case, but just wanted to share in case it helps answer the question.

You’re right. The local graph was the first time the graph made a giant leap in functionality (for me). I need to play around with use cases using the “incoming” “outgoing” and “neighbor” links. How are you using it so far?

What does the acronym TK stand for?

“to come”

Apparently it’s a term journalists use. They choose “TK” because few words have a ‘t’ and a ‘k’ next to each other. So “TK” becomes a decent search term to use as well.

When I search my note library, the only false positives are “hotkey” and random URLs.